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Ultimate one day itinerary in Page, AZ. Antelope Canyon, Lake Powell, Horseshoe Bend

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One day is not enough time to see everything in Page, AZ. But if you have to do it to stay on schedule, or you booked all your stay before visiting this website, this is the way to get the most out of your time (minimizing driving, and hitting optimal times for tours.) Here is the best one day itinerary in Page, AZ.

  • Sunrise:  Drive to Page, AZ/Antelope Canyon from where you are. Assuming you are in Zion, Grand Canyon, Sedona, or Monument Valley, this will take you between 2-4 hours.
  • 1030: tour of Antelope Canyon – Book a tour with Lower or Upper Antelope Canyon. Both Lower Antelope Canyon companies are suitable, or drive directly to Upper Canyon. 
  • 1 pm: Drive to Antelope Point Marina and have lunch at Ja’di’To’oh, the restaurant on the docks of the marina. Despite the funny name, its mostly burgers, pizza, salads, and sandwiches (at marina prices.)
  • 2 pm: Book a tour of Lake Powell with Antelope Point marina. This tour will take you up Antelope Canyon on the lake. There are other tours of the lake, but this is the fastest and has the least travel time on the water to get to a canyon.

524 Responses

  1. Hi Alley!
    Great information, and really helpful.
    Me and my wife are planning a trip to Vegas in April. And we thought let’s do Page as well.
    So, how many days do we really really need in Page? Would 2 nights be good?
    I have seen photos of Page .. Very artistic. We are not big hikers, and haven’t done much boating, etc.
    So, if you could please give your suggestion so I can plan accordingly.
    We want to make it a very memorable one! 🙂

    1. Hi Sagar!
      Thank you for your nice comments.
      With 2 days in Page, AZ, you should have a wonderful time, even if, as you say, you are not big hikers or experienced boaters!
      The drive over from Las Vegas will take you anywhere from 4.5-6 hours depending on traffic in a construction zone through the Virgin River Gorge on I-15, and how often you stop to take photos (it’s a very scenic drive, especially the latter half). Due to the driving distance/time, you will probably want to take it easy that afternoon, have a nice dinner somewhere in town, then retire early.
      The next morning, plan to visit Horseshoe Bend right at sunrise to take advantage of cooler temperatures and fewer people, then tour Upper Antelope Canyon. If you would like to get out on Lake Powell without navigating your own boat, consider bundling your Antelope Canyon hiking tour with a boat tour of its waterside!
      On your departure day, you might also make an early morning of it and partake of some other activities such as a scenic flight over Monument Valley, an in-depth tour of the Glen Canyon Dam, stopping at the Big Water Visitors Center and Dinosaur Museum, or a simple walk to The “New” Wave and Radio Tower Rock.
      As you can see, you’ll have no problem filling 2 days in Page, AZ, with fun and adventure! For more suggestions, check out this piece on our companion site, HorseshoeBend.com, “48 Hours in Page, Arizona”
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

      1. Planning on a trip to Page, AZ in October – will one day be sufficient to do both Horseshoe Bend and Antelope Canyon?
        Thanks.

        1. Hi John,
          One day is sufficient to visit Horseshoe Bend and tour Antelope Canyon; the two attractions are close enough to one another (~10 minutes drive) so that it shouldn’t be a problem — in theory, anyway.
          It depends on whether the Navajo Tribe reopens the Antelope Canyons to tours by then. As of now, all Navajo Indian Tribal Parks such as Monument Valley, the Four Corners, Canyon de Chelly tours, and the Antelope Canyons are closed at least through July 6th due to COVID-19. Navajo Nation Parks & Recreation
          If they do decide to extend the closure of the Antelope Canyons into the timeframe you are scheduled to visit, there are other beautiful slot canyons near Page, AZ, that are not located on Indian Tribal lands and therefore, not bound by their decision.
          Since I don’t know the makeup of your traveling party (Kids? Seniors? Neither? Everyone in good shape, or not so much?), I’ll err on the side of caution and recommend Red Canyon aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon near Kanab, UT (not to be confused with “another” Peek-A-Boo Canyon near Escalante, UT!). It’s a beatufiul slot canyon ~ 1 hour away from Page, AZ, and an easy hike. Although a guided tour is “technically” not required to visit Red Canyon, we strongly recommend that you use one as the drive to access the canyon is on a potentially hazardous unpaved road, which shouldn’t be attempted by parties in rental cars. Licensed tour companies that can help you out are:
          – Dreamland Safari Tours, (435) 412-1790, http://www.dreamlandtours.net
          – TC Tours, (435) 668-5262, http://www.slotcanyontourskanab.com
          – Kanab Tour Company, (435) 644-5525, http://www.kanabtourcompany.com
          – Forever Adventure Tours, 435-644-5700, http://www.foreveradventuretours.com
          – Grand Circle Tours, (928) 691-0166, http://www.vermillioncliffs.net
          If everyone in your group is in relatively good shape and up for a somethign a little more adventurous, you might consider Wire Pass Canyon and/or Buckskin Gulch. These two slot canyons are located between Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT. The walk to the entrance of the initial slot (Wire Pass) is via a typically dry streambed, which may feature deep sand. An 8-10’ drop a short distance into the slot canyon is one reason why Wire Pass Canyon may not be appropriate for those traveling with young children, the elderly, or individuals afraid of heights. As the canyon walls become higher and closer together, they suddenly open up as the second slot connects with the Buckskin Gulch, which is an extremely long slot canyon that eventually joins with the Paria River. If you’ve had enough at this point, you can simply turn around and head back to your vehicle. If you’d like to explore further, you can easily make a half-day hike out of the immediate area around the confluence of Wire Pass and Buckskin. Look for some bighorn sheep petroglyphs dating back hundreds, maybe thousands of years! Access to Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch is off US89 between Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT, on the House Rock Valley Road. Hikers are required to pay a self-permitting fee at the kiosk by the trailhead. Fair warning: the House Rock Valley Road is unpaved! While it is accessible to 2WD vehicles much of the time, if recent weather has brought any moisture whatsoever, the HRVR can turn into a muddy, impassable mess. Parties in rental cars should think twice about attempting this road since off-road driving is strictly prohibited by most rental car companies. A guided tour will get your family to Wire Pass Canyon and back in one piece, and turn you onto features you might have missed trying to find your own way. Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT based companies offering guided tours to Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch include:
          Detours American West, 480-633-9013, http://www.detoursamericanwest.com
          Paria Outpost & Outfitters, 928-691-1047, http://www.paria.com
          Grand Staircase Discovery Tours, 928-614-4099, http://www.grandstaircasediscoverytours.com
          Should you need to consider one of the above “off-rez” slot canyons, it would be best to allow an extra day in Page, AZ, to accommodate these activities. If the Antelope Canyons are reopened, stay an extra day in Page, AZ, anyway — there’s plenty to see ande do! Ultimate 2-Day Itinerary in Page, AZ
          Good luck and safe travels,
          Alley 🙂

          1. Hi Alley!

            Your write-ups are extremely helpful. As unfamiliar travelers, who are bummed by the current COVID-19 closures at Antelope Canyon, your alternative canyon plans have inspired us to do either Peek-a-Boo Canyon or Wire-Pass to Buckskin Gulch. I will be in a group of 4 young and fit adults, so Wire Pass sounds more satisfying. At first it sounded like a guided tour wouldn’t be necessary, but at the end you made it seem like muddy roads could derail us quickly.

            We plan to travel the 2nd week of November and wanted to know how we would access WirePass/Buckskin Gulch on our own and if it’s possible to hike without driving on unpaved roads? Please let us know – thanks again for your helpful responses

          2. Hey Eddie!
            Glad our suggestions for alternatives to Antelope Canyon have proven helpful.
            Unfortunately, you pretty much have to take the House Rock Valley Road to get to Wire Pass Canyon. The road is regularly graded, but what conditions will be like in mid-November, it’s too soon to call. In two decades plus of living in that area, I’ve seen conditions that time of year range from sunny and brisk to borderline blizzard. My advice is to start monitoring area weather about two weeks before you get set to travel. That will give you the best idea of what to expect. Another thing you can do is contact the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument Visitors Center in Big Water, Utah. They usually have up to date reports on the viability of the House Rock Valley Road. Their phone # is (435) 675-3200.
            Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels,
            Alley 🙂

  2. Hello there. We are visiting for the first time in June this year. Can you advise which of the 2 Antelope Canyons you would suggest for a first time visit and how do they differ? Can you walk these along or do you have to book onto a tour please?

    1. Hi Tricia,
      Which branch of the Antelope Canyons you tour depends largely on your traveling party. If you have infants or toddlers, seniors, or anyone with mobility limitations with you, you’d want to stick to Upper Antelope Canyon since it is a relatively easy 100-yard out-and-back walk on a flat trail. If everyone in your group is relatively fit and OK with managing a few ladders, stairs, and small boulders in a ~500-600 yard walk, then you should have no problem touring Lower Antelope Canyon. You might wish to watch this full video walk-through of Lower Antelope Canyon to get a sense of what it’s like. Note that the people in the video are wearing backpacks, which is no longer allowed.
      Whichever you decide, a guided tour is required to visit Antelope Canyon, which must be booked in advance. How to book a tour for Antelope Canyon
      While in Page, AZ, don’t forget to visit Horseshoe Bend as well!
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

    1. Hello,
      If you are referring to Antelope Canyon tours, it depends on whether you choose to tour Upper or Lower Antelope Canyon.
      The price for children age 4-12 to tour Lower Antelope Canyon is $28/each.
      For Upper Antelope Canyon tours, there are only two companies that allow children 6 or younger to tour with them.
      With Roger Ekis’ Antelope Canyon Tours, children ages 0-7 can tour at off-peak hours for $44 + $8 Navajo Park Permit Fee + Tax. Children’s peak hour prices (mid-day) are $59 + $8 Navajo Park Permit Fee + Tax
      Antelope Canyon Navajo Tours charges $60 each for children age 0-12 on all tours.
      Hope that clarifies the issue better. Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  3. Hi, we have been to Page before (20 years ago!) we hired a boat on Lake Powell and LOVED it but didn’t know about Antelope Canyon or Horseshoe Bend then so we are keen to incorporate it into our summer 2020 tour. We are really stuck and confused about how to plan things, please can you help? We are planning to drive from Palm Springs to the Grand Canyon, have one night here then on to Page for 2 nights where we will take in Antelope Canyon etc and also hire a boat on the lake. Are there only organised tours of the Canyon or can we drive/walk ourselves? Then we need to get to Vegas where we would like to spend a couple of nights before heading back to LAX for our journey home to England. Should we incorporate Zion after Page? If so, will one night be enough? Thank you, Nikki.

    1. Hi Nikki,
      Glad to hear that you’re planning a return visit to Page, AZ, to visit Antelope Canyon and Horseshoe Bend. You’ll find that Page, AZ, has grown quite a bit!
      Your trip looks quite well-planned as it is. You’ll find that the Grand Canyon is a very easy park to self-tour. On your arrival day, concentrate your sightseeing on Grand Canyon Village Historic District and the Hermit’s Rest/West Rim Drive. The latter area is closed to private vehicles during the summer months, but a free shuttle goes out to all the viewpoints along that 8-mile spur road that extends West of GC Village. If you wish, you can do a mix of walking along the easy, paved Rim Trail and riding the shuttles in between.
      On your way to Page, AZ, you’ll do a big chunk of your sightseeing of the Grand Canyon because the most logical route takes you out the East Rim/Desert View Drive of the park, where there are over half a dozen named viewpoints of the Grand Canyon, all with differing perspectives and distinguishing features. Don’t be surprised if this 2.5 hour drive ends up taking more along the lines of 3.5-4 hours. Consider stopping at the Cameron Trading Post for breakfast or brunch – the Navajo Tacos are delicious!
      Plan to tour Antelope Canyon the afternoon you arrive, then hit Horseshoe Bend just after sunrise the next morning before your Lake Powell boat rental or tour.
      On your way back to Las Vegas, I definitely would recommend going through Zion, but you really should allow for 2-3 days to fully explore and enjoy it. It’s a beautiful and huge park with lots to see and do. If it’s not possible to set aside at least an overnight, you can certainly drive through there on your way from Page, AZ, to Las Vegas, NV. That will add anywhere from 90 minutes to 2 hours onto your drive time.
      Hope that helps! Good luck, safe travels, and Happy New Year,
      Alley 🙂

  4. Hello Alley

    I saw that “deluxe” tour has 4 people in a group instead of 10 in “general”. If we book the triple crown package, would the canyon tours still deluxe in both the canyons? thanks.

    1. Hi Hsiaomei,
      The “deluxe” Lower Antelope Canyon tour with the smaller group is not included in the Triple Crown package. The standard sightseer’s tour is what this package includes. If you prefer to do the “deluxe” Lower Antelope Canyon tour, you could simply book that tour by itself, then book the other two components of the Triple Crown (Upper Antelope and the Boat Tour) as a bundle. Just be sure to allow enough time between tours to transit to the different departure points.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

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