Driving to Antelope Canyon

The Antelope Canyons are located in Northern Arizona, a few miles Southeast of the town of Page, Arizona.

Driving distances from major cities and tourist destinations are as follows: 

  • Los Angeles, California – 9 hours

  • Phoenix, Arizona – 4.5 hours

  • Las Vegas, Nevada – 4.5 hours

  • Flagstaff, Arizona – 2.5 hours

  • Sedona, Arizona – 3 hours

  • St. George, Utah – 2.5 hours

  • Zion National Park, Utah – 2 hours 

  • Grand Canyon South Rim – 2.5 hours

  • Grand Canyon North Rim – 2.5 hours

  • Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah – 3 hours

  • Moab, Utah – 5 hours

  • Monument Valley, Utah – 2 hours

Note that the times given reflect driving directly, with minimal stops. This rarely happens since most of these drives are very scenic, and you will be stopping to take pictures, guaranteed! For planning purposes, it’s a good idea to pad these figures by 20-30%.

Upon arrival in Page, AZ, you will be required to take a guided tour to Antelope Canyon. You cannot simply drive up to the canyon’s entrance and walk in at will. Well before making the trip to Page, AZ, you should do some research on which section of Antelope Canyon you wish to tour, and make a reservation. Depending on which tour company you book with, you will be required to check in anywhere from 30-60 minutes prior to your Antelope Canyon tour. 

If you opt to visit Upper Antelope Canyon, there are 4 tour companies in all that tour this branch of Antelope Canyon: 2 that depart from the town of Page, AZ, and 2 that depart from near the Tribal Park Entrance on US98. If you choose to go to Lower Antelope Canyon, there are 2 companies that manage this section of the slot canyon, both located on the North side of US98 near the defunct Navajo Generating Station. Tour both Lower & Upper Antelope Canyons

If you would like to add an Antelope Canyon waterside boat tour onto your slot canyon tour(s), these depart from Antelope Point Marina, just a short distance down US98 from the Lower Antelope Canyon tour entrance. 

If you are staying someplace like Phoenix, Sedona, Flagstaff, Grand Canyon South Rim, or Las Vegas, and aren’t keen on doing all that driving, guided tours from these areas to Antelope Canyon and Horseshoe Bend are available by bus, van, or fixed-wing airplane. 

Download this Map of Page and the surrounding area, compliments of Antelope Canyon Now

218 Responses

  1. Does this site (https://antelopecanyon.az/) book Antelope Canyon with the 4 operators or does this site have its own guided tour? The reason I’m asking is that most of the 4 Antelope Canyon operators haven’t opened up for 2022 March or beyond booking yet. But this site already has availability for dates after February 2022.

    1. Hi Sophie,
      This is a good question!
      We are a privately owned site, but we work with the majority of the Antelope Canyon tour operators in Page, AZ. We are fortunate to have a good arrangement with them which enables us to offer seats before other sites do.
      Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂
      http://horseshoebend.com
      http://antelopecanyon.az
      http://thewaveaz.com
      http://antelopecanyonboattours.com
      http://alstrompoint.com
      http://towerbutte.com
      http://canyonskywalk.com

  2. Me and my family will be staying in Yavapai Lodge from Nov 28th to 30th . Kids are aged 9 and 5 years.
    I want to see Upper Antelope Canyon , Lower Antelope Canyon and Horse shoe bend.
    Can I drive myself from Yavapai lodge to Upper ,Lower Antelope canyons and Horse shoe bend.
    Are they any guided tours from Yavapai lodge ?

    1. Hi Varun,
      There are no guided tours from Grand Canyon South Rim that do what you’re wanting to accomplish.
      You’ll need to self-drive from Grand Canyon South Rim to Page, AZ, which is about a ~3.5 hour drive one way. If you’ve looked on Google maps and found a drive time figure of 2 hours and change, that’s “wheels turning, no stops,” which rarely happens because the drive is very scenic and you will be stopping to take pictures more often than your think! You should definitely take advantage of the opportunity to visit the more than half a dozen Grand Canyon viewpoints between Grand Canyon Village and Desert View Point, all with varying perspectives and features that make them worthwhile photo stops.
      A guided tour is required to visit both Upper Antelope and Lower Antelope Canyon. Regarding Lower Antelope Canyon, I would consider carefully whether this would be an appropriate activity for your 5 year old. It’s not a super-hard hike, but there are several staircases and ladders that one must navigate to get down into the canyon, then ascend back out of it. To get a sense of what that looks like, watch this Full Video Walk-Through of Lower Antelope Canyon Note that backpacks are no longer allowed in Lower or Upper Antelope Canyon (this video was made a few years ago). Also, there’s a new network of steps and walkways to navigate from the exit of Upper Antelope Canyon back to the vehicle parking area. Both Antelope Canyon and Lower Antelope Canyon will take anywhere from 90 minutes to 2 hours each to visit.
      Horseshoe Bend can be visited at one’s leisure during normal operating hours of the parking lot, which are sunrise to sunset. At the time of year you are visiting, sunrise takes place at 7:16 am and sunset occurs around 5:11 pm. Allot at least 60-90 minutes to park your vehicle, walk to the rim, take photos, then walk back to your vehicle.
      Since you don’t have much daylight to work with in late November, I do not recommend you attempt to visit the Antelope Canyons and/or Horseshoe Bend as a day trip from Yavapai Lodge. Nighttime driving is strongly discouraged in this part of the U.S. due to local roads being very dimly lit and the possible presence of deer, elk, and even livestock animals that can elevate your risk of a collision. That’s not something you want to chance in an unfamiliar area that’s pitch black, freezing cold, where cell service is spotty (IF you can get any bars at all), and help will be a long time coming, not to mention VERY expensive. It would be best if you were able to stay overnight at a hotel in Page, AZ, in order to accomplish everything on your wish list without risking a nighttime drive back to the South Rim.
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  3. I am trying to book both the upper and lower antelope canyon trip during th same weekend I am there. Trying for October 2021 Can you help me

  4. I would love to see the Wave or Antelope Canyon, but cannot walk too far. What do you recommend? Note, I can walk some, a couple miles but not much more.

    1. Hi Daina,
      Sorry to be the bearer of bad news re: The Wave, it’s a 6+ mile round-trip hike that’s moderately difficult. It doesn’t sound like a good fit for you. Also, there’s the matter of getting a Wave permit, which is quite difficult on the best of days. One possible saving grace here, is that it is possible to charter a plane or a helicopter over The Wave. These are most readily available (by advance reservation) out of Page, Arizona. While neither aircraft would land at The Wave, you’d still see a ton of incredible scenery in addition to The Wave in a matter of minutes instead of hours. For more information, visit our companion site, TheWaveAZ.com and check out “So You Didn’t Get A Wave Permit – Now What?”
      Upper Antelope Canyon or Secret Antelope Canyon would be more feasible for you, unfortunately, these are both closed due to COVID-19 and the closure of the Navajo Indian Reservation to tourists.
      An alternative you might consider is Wire Pass Canyon/Buckskin Gulch near Paria, UT, ~1 hour from Page, AZ. Wire Pass Canyon is a photogenic two-part slot canyon that is short enough for intermediate-level hikers to enjoy, yet offers the option to delve further into Buckskin Gulch for those wanting more of a challenge. The walk to the entrance of the initial slot is via a typically dry streambed, which typically contains deep sand. An 8-10’ drop a short distance into the slot canyon is one reason why Wire Pass Canyon may not be appropriate for those traveling with young children, the elderly, or individuals afraid of heights, but a makeshift ladder has recently been placed in this area. As the canyon walls become higher and closer together, they suddenly open up as the second slot connects with the Buckskin Gulch. If you’ve had enough at this point, you can simply turn around and head back to your vehicle. If you’d like to explore further, you can easily make a half-day hike out of the immediate area around the confluence with the Buckskin. Look for some bighorn sheep petroglyphs dating back hundreds, maybe thousands of years! Access to Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch is off US89 between Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT, on the House Rock Valley Road. Hikers are required to pay a self-permitting fee at the kiosk by the trailhead. Fair warning: the House Rock Valley Road is unpaved! While it is accessible to 2WD vehicles much of the time, if recent weather has brought any moisture whatsoever, the HRVR can turn into a muddy, impassable mess. Parties in rental cars should think twice about attempting this road since off-road driving is strictly prohibited by most rental car companies. A guided tour will get your family to Wire Pass Canyon and back in one piece, and turn you onto features you might have missed trying to find your own way. Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT based companies offering guided tours to Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch include:
      – Detours American West, 480-633-9013, http://www.detoursamericanwest.com
      – Paria Outpost & Outfitters, 928-691-1047, http://www.paria.com
      – Grand Staircase Discovery Tours, 928-614-4099, http://www.grandstaircasediscoverytours.com
      Hope that helps. Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  5. Hi, is there a date for when Antelope Canyon will be reopened. I’m going to be in Sedona in May and have always wanted to visit.

    1. Hi Jennifer,
      Unfortunately, we don’t know. The Antelope Canyons are expected to remain closed through Spring, optimistically.
      If seeing a slot canyon remains high on your priority list — which we wouldn’t blame you a bit for! — there are other options. Pumphouse Wash, from what I understand (I haven’t been there personally) is a beautiful canyon and a relatively easy hike, best of all, it’s on the outskirts of Sedona. You might have to trudge through a few pools, but in May, the cool water should be welcome.
      If you’re planning on visiting the Page, AZ, area anyway, there are two other beautiful slot canyons a short drive away that you’d probably enjoy as well. Wire Pass Canyon/Buckskin Gulch, and Red Canyon/aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon.
      Wire Pass Canyon is a photogenic two-part slot canyon that is short enough for intermediate-level hikers to enjoy, yet offers the option to delve further into Buckskin Gulch for those wanting more of a challenge. The walk to the entrance of the initial slot is via a typically dry streambed, which may feature deep sand. An 8-10’ drop a short distance into the slot canyon is one reason why Wire Pass Canyon may not be appropriate for those traveling with young children, the elderly, or individuals afraid of heights. A makeshift ladder may sometimes be available. As the canyon walls become higher and closer together, they suddenly open up as the second slot connects with the Buckskin Gulch. If you’ve had enough at this point, you can simply turn around and head back to your vehicle. If you’d like to explore further, you can easily make a half-day hike out of the immediate area around the confluence with the Buckskin. Look for some bighorn sheep petroglyphs dating back hundreds, maybe thousands of years! Access to Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch is off US89 between Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT, on the House Rock Valley Road. Hikers are required to pay a self-permitting fee at the kiosk by the trailhead. Fair warning: the House Rock Valley Road is unpaved! While it is accessible to 2WD vehicles much of the time, if recent weather has brought any moisture whatsoever, the HRVR can turn into a muddy, impassable mess. Parties in rental cars should think twice about attempting this road since off-road driving is strictly prohibited by most rental car companies. A guided tour will get your family to Wire Pass Canyon and back in one piece, and turn you onto features you might have missed trying to find your own way. Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT based companies offering guided tours to Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch include:
      – Detours American West, 480-633-9013, http://www.detoursamericanwest.com
      – Paria Outpost & Outfitters, 928-691-1047, http://www.paria.com
      – Grand Staircase Discovery Tours, 928-614-4099, http://www.grandstaircasediscoverytours.com
      Red Canyon aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon: not to be confused with Peek-A-Boo Canyon in the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, this family-friendly slot canyon is located between Kanab and Mt. Carmel Junction, Utah, approximately 90 minutes from Page, AZ. With twists and turns on par with the Antelope Canyons, this short but memorable walk features classic slot canyon scenery (including the occasional light beams in the summertime), as well as some unique features such as ancient “moqui” steps, and “Shaman’s Needle,” a pencil-thin stone column located in a small sub-drainage near the canyon’s entrance. While a guided tour is not required to get to Peek-A-Boo, we strongly recommend that you consider taking one, because while the walk through the canyon itself is usually not difficult, the drive to get there can be. 4WD vehicles with adequate clearance are a definite must, with tire pressure lowered to accommodate potentially deep sand. If you’re driving a rental car, forget it! You will void your insurance the minute your tires part with the pavement, which means you’d be on the hook for a very expensive rescue, should you need one, and have to foot the bill for any damage you’d sustain. If you want to try your hand at self-driving, go 7.5 miles past the Kanab, UT, city limit sign on US 89; turn onto BLM road #102 and follow it 4 miles in until you find the parking area. For those who would prefer to explore Peek-A-Boo in the safety and comfort of a guided tour, there are several reputable companies to choose from in Kanab, UT, including:
      – Dreamland Safari Tours, (435) 412-1790, http://www.dreamlandtours.net
      – TC Tours, (435) 668-5262, http://www.slotcanyontourskanab.com
      – Kanab Tour Company, (435) 644-5525, http://www.kanabtourcompany.com
      – Forever Adventure Tours, 435-644-5700, http://www.foreveradventuretours.com
      – Grand Circle Tours, (928) 691-0166, http://www.vermilioncliffs.net
      Another option: kayaking into the waterside of Antelope Canyon with a rental kayak or guided tour from Antelope Point Marina. Depending on the water level of Lake Powell, you can probably hike into the extreme lower end of the slot canyon where it empties into the lake. This section of Antelope Canyon is on Federal and not Tribal Land. For more information, visit AntelopeCanyon.AZ: Lake Powell Hidden Canyon Kayak Tour
      Sorry we couldn’t be more specific on what will be available come May. Hope you have a great time, regardless!
      Alley 🙂

  6. Tried getting to Antelope Canyon, we had GPS the Antelope Canyon but only came upon 2 different touring companies. Is there a national park sign that says welcome to Antelope Canyon? If so where is the location entrance if you don’t mind me asking?

    1. Hi John,
      Don’t mind you asking at all. There are more than 2 tour companies that manage the Antelope Canyons, but you might not be able to get there this time around. The entrance to the Antelope Canyons (main branches, Lower & Upper), is on US98, about 5 miles Southeast of the town of Page, AZ, West of the now defunct Navajo Generating Station. Map
      At the moment, however, the canyons are closed due to COVID-19. They are expected to reopen on July 27th, but frankly, it’s doubtful that that will take place due to COVID-19 cases continuing to crop up.
      Recommend you start thinking of a “Plan B” as far as slot canyon tours are concerned. We recommend Red Canyon, aka Peek-A-Boo Canyon (not to be confused with Peek-A-Boo Canyon in the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument!), a family-friendly slot canyon located near Kanab, UT, approximately 90 minutes from Page, AZ. With twists and turns on par with the Antelope Canyons, this short but memorable walk features classic slot canyon scenery (including the occasional light beams in the summertime), as well as some unique features such as ancient “moqui” steps, and “Shaman’s Needle,” a pencil-thin stone column located in a small sub-drainage near the canyon’s entrance. While a guided tour is not required to get to Peek-A-Boo, we strongly recommend that you consider taking one, because while the walk through the canyon itself is usually not difficult, the drive to get there can be. Reputable companies in Kanab, UT, that cover Peek-A-Boo are:
      – Dreamland Safari Tours, (435) 412-1790, http://www.dreamlandtours.net
      – TC Tours, (435) 668-5262, http://www.slotcanyontourskanab.com
      – Kanab Tour Company, (435) 644-5525, http://www.kanabtourcompany.com
      – Forever Adventure Tours, 435-644-5700, http://www.foreveradventuretours.com
      – Grand Circle Tours, (928) 691-0166, http://www.vermilioncliffs.net
      If you’re up for something a little more adventurous, Wire Pass Canyon is a photogenic two-part slot canyon that is short enough for intermediate-level hikers to enjoy, yet offers the option to delve further into Buckskin Gulch for those wanting more of a challenge. After paying a nominal self-permitting fee at the kiosk by the trailhead, the walk to the entrance of the initial slot is via a typically dry streambed, which usually consists of deep sand. An 8-10’ drop a short distance into the slot canyon is one reason why Wire Pass Canyon may not be appropriate for those traveling with young children, the elderly, or individuals afraid of heights. As the canyon walls become higher and closer together, they suddenly open up as the second slot connects with the Buckskin Gulch. If you’ve had enough at this point, you can simply turn around and head back to your vehicle. If you’d like to explore further, you can easily make a half-day hike out of the immediate area around the confluence with the Buckskin. Look for some bighorn sheep petroglyphs dating back hundreds, maybe thousands of years. Access to Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch is off US89 between Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT, on the House Rock Valley Road, another unpaved road that can be problematic for parties in rental cars. While it is accessible to 2WD vehicles much of the time, if recent weather has brought any moisture whatsoever, the HRVR can turn into a muddy, impassable mess. Here again, a guided tour, while not required, will get your family to Wire Pass Canyon and back in one piece, and turn you onto features you might have missed trying to find your own way. Page, AZ, and Kanab, UT based companies offering guided tours to Wire Pass Canyon and the Buckskin Gulch include:
      – Detours American West, 480-633-9013, http://www.detoursamericanwest.com
      – Paria Outpost & Outfitters, 928-691-1047, http://www.paria.com
      – Grand Staircase Discovery Tours, 928-614-4099, http://www.grandstaircasediscoverytours.com
      Hope that helps! Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley 🙂

  7. Dear Alley-
    We would like to make the hike to the Waves next spring. If we book with a tour company, do we still need to apply for the park permits or does the tour companies include them with the tour?

    1. Hi Vaughn!
      Great question 🙂
      The answer is, yes, if you choose to go to The Waves with a tour company, you would still need to secure a hiking permit.
      For more information on how to get a Wave permit, visit our companion site, http://www.TheWaveAZ.com
      Good luck and safe travels,
      Alley

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